Texas has electricity consumption of $24 billion a year, the highest among the U.S. states. Its annual consumption is comparable to that of Great Britain and Spain, and if the state were an independent nation, its electricity market would be the 11th largest in the world. Texas produces the most wind electricity in the U.S., but also has the highest Carbon Dioxide Emissions of any state.[4] As of 2012, Texas residential electricity rates ranked 31st in the United States and average monthly residential electric bills in Texas were the 5th highest in the nation.[5]
The Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) does it for you. When you sign up for a plan with a new provider, ERCOT will send you a mailer confirming the switch. You have three days upon receiving the mailer to change your mind. If you don't, you'll have a new provider within seven days, and ERCOT will notify your old provider. Switch Energy remember, if you abandon a contract before it's complete, you will be on the hook for any fees or penalties detailed in its Terms of Service.
4) Sign-Up and Confirmation: Once you’ve chosen the retail electricity provider that best suits your needs, just sign up directly from the website. Keep in mind that Texas electricity providers require a credit check, so be prepared to provide your social security number. Although you may have a decent FICO score – you may have a very low Utility Score and have to pay a deposit. Electricity companies use a TEC (Telecommunications, Energy, and Cable) score, a risk model developed specifically for telecomm and energy accounts, to determine if a deposit is required. Based on your score, your electricity service deposit may range from $100 to $400. Many times utilities do not provide payment histories to credit reporting agencies, so find out if your current provider have options (i.e. providing a letter) to show that your previous utility credit is in good standing.
Variable Rate Plans: Designed as month-to-month contracts, these plans are in total control of your energy provider, which can shift the price you pay per kWh at its discretion. This means you, the consumer, are in a better place to reap the benefits when the energy market falls — but it also means you're at risk for hikes in prices, whether as a result of natural disasters or the provider's bottom line. Variable plans always offer a full year of price history to show the average price per kWh so you can get a sense of what you're getting into (like this one from Cheapest Electric Company) and know this: Variable plans don't have cancellation fees. You can cut your service at any time — a huge incentive for Compare Electricity Rates to keep their prices reasonable.
Since the electricity market opened, more and more electricity providers have entered the market with various plans and products. Compare Electricity Rates and their affiliated brands: Compare Electricity Companies, Compare Electricity Rates, and Compare Energy Rates offer a multitude of electricity plans and benefits so customers can find the electricity plan that best fits their needs. While it’s great to have so many options, it can be difficult and confusing to choose an electricity plan. With choices like fixed-rate, variable-rate, and prepaid plans, as well as varying price options, term lengths and rewards, shopping for an electricity plan can be an overwhelming task.
Power to Choose is a program run by the Cheapest Electricity Rates of Texas. Its goal is to protect residents of the state from unfair energy costs and unregulated Compare Electricity Rates, as well as develop a strong infrastructure. The program provides an easy to use, online tool that give residents of the state the opportunity to compare rates, plans and other energy options. Keep in mind though, you really need to read the fine print if you decide to use Power to Choose (or any other service, for that matter).
For example, shoppers for Texas electricity plans in the 77494 ZIP code in Katy, TX, could find 12-month plans for 6.8 cents/kWh in February; by June, electricity rates had increased 27 percent to 9.3 cents/kWh. As of early September, 12-month plans were up again, to 9.9 cents/kWh – a 6.5 percent hike from June and a 46 percent increase just since February.
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