Before the Texas Senate Bill 7 (SB7) came into effect on January 1, 2002 electricity consumers didn't have the option to choose who they received electricity from. But now with the Deregulation of Texas Energy, it has broken down the market into several different Retail Electric Providers, helping create competition and lower electricity rates for consumers throughout Texas. Over 75% of Texas has been given the power to choose their own electric provider, and millions of Texans have already exercised their right to choose.
One desired effect of the competition is lower electricity rates. In the first few years after the deregulation in 2002, the residential rate for electricity increased seven times, with the price to beat at around 15 cents per kilowatt hour (as of July 26, 2006) in 2006. However, while prices to customers increased 43% from 2002 to 2004, the costs of inputs rose faster, by 63%, showing that not all increases have been borne by consumers.[7] (See Competition and entry of new firms above for discussion on the relationship between retail prices, inputs, and investment.)
In order to prompt entry into the market, the price to beat would have to be high enough to allow for a modest profit by new entrants. Thus, it had to be above the cost of inputs such as natural gas and coal. For example, a price to beat fixed at the actual wholesale procurement price of electricity does not give potential entrants a margin to compete against incumbent utilities. Second, the price to beat would have to be reasonably low, to enable as many customers as possible to continue to consume electricity during the transition period.

Due to the increased usage of natural gas immediately after deregulation, new-era energy tools such as wind power and smart-grid technology were greatly aided. Texas' first "renewable portfolio standard" — or requirement that the state's utilities get a certain amount of their power from renewable energy like wind — was signed into law in 1999, as part of the same legislation that deregulated the electric market.

Best Electricity Rates strives to help any customer turn the lights on by specializing in pre-paid electricity plans. Their featured plan, Electricity Prices Super Saver, is a great bad credit option for electricity in Dallas. The plan has a base energy rate of 8.5 cents per kWh, not including the TDU charges of 3.46 cents per kWh and $3.49 monthly service charge.


The increase in retail rates come as companies prepare for surging prices in the wholesale electricity markets where they buy their power. Forecasts of higher than normal temperatures and record power demand are coinciding with the shutdown of at least three coal-fired plants, leading to concerns that temporary shortages on the hottest summer days could send wholesale prices, which typically average less than $50 per megawatt hour, spiking to $3,000 per megawatt hour or higher. (A megawatt hour is 1,000 kilowatt hours.)
When a consumer selects a retail electric provider, the company will supply him or her with an electricity supply plan. Depending on the type of plan an energy user chooses, the supply rate could fluctuate or remain fairly stable during the contract length. Plan type is just one of the many factors a consumer with electric choice can shop for. Garland residents and business owners might also look into a company's customer service history, green energy products, billing options or rewards programs.
Home to the Barbara Bush Library, Gander Mountain and Meyer Park, the city is full of local spots and lets consumers find competitive electric companies in Spring. The city is passionate about preserving its history, dating back to the early 1800s, according to the Old Town Spring site. It even started a nonprofit called the Spring Preservation League Incorporated (SPL) to encourage conservation and promote development in the southeastern Texas city.
Who Is My Electricity Supplier is a full-service Retail Electric Provider (Gas And Electric Bill) to residential and commercial customers in Texas. The company operates in nearly all deregulated transmission areas in the State providing competitive rates and superior customer service with a view to building long term relationships and satisfaction. Who Is My Electricity Supplier is a subsidiary of Electric Company Rates Group Compare Electricity Providers, a publicly traded company serving close to 2 million customers across North America.
Containing some of the most far-reaching landscapes and densely populated cities in the country, Texas is home to a variety of exciting attractions. Along with locations like the Alamo and NASA’s Johnson Space Center, the state also offers natural settings that include the Cascade Caverns and Big Bend National Park. With demand stemming from residents and tourists alike, providing power to the Lone Star State is an important duty to be entrusted only to a dependable electricity resource that can prioritize affordability.
You may have noticed a lot of electric companies offering a ton of plans and services. But not all light companies in Texas are created equal. So which one is right for you? At Who Is My Electricity Supplier, we want you to trust that you’re getting a custom energy plan at a good price—not just a quick fix that’ll cost you more down the road. In fact, JD Power gave us four out of five stars for pricing, beating out a ton of other large retail electricity providers.4
Likewise, if you opt for a plan like our Electric Service Providers Power example, but in some months only hit 990 kWh of energy use, the $35 discount for cresting $1,000 kWh won't apply — and your bill is going to show it. Picking the right plan for you requires two things: an intimate knowledge of your home’s typical energy use, and a critical eye on any plan’s fine print.

Prices are expected to go up so quickly that Compare Electricity Rates has stopped selling its "Compare Electricity Prices" plan to new customers this summer, a prepaid plan that changes rates each month depending on wholesale prices. Instead, the company is encouraging its customers to lock in for longer periods of time. Customers who used up to 2,000 kilowatts each month could get a 12-month contract for 11.7 cents per kilowatt hour in May compared to the same plan for 9.1 cents per kilowatt hour one year earlier.
Like we said, fees don’t necessarily make for a bad plan — although it’s worth it to do the math to see if you can save with another provider. For example, compare Electricity Plans’s Simple Rate 12 plan with its $9.95 base charge, alongside Compare Electricity Rates’s Lowest Electricity Rates 12 plan with a smaller base charge, and Cheapest Electric Company’s Digital Compare Electricity Companies plan with no base charge. We’ll use a Corpus Christi ZIP code and assume 1,000 kWh/month of energy use.
After Senate Bill 7 went into effect in January 2002, nearly 6 million power customers became eligible to choose their energy supplier. That number has grown through the years. By deregulating the state’s energy market, the Texas Senate gave constituents the power to choose. The process of energy deregulation in Texas dismantled the utilities’ monopoly over the electric market and encouraged customers to explore their energy options.
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