Compare Electricity Plans offers its customers a large variety of electricity plans and payment options as well as insightful tools to help its customers manage their electricity usage. In recognition for their commitment to excellence, Compare Electricity Plans was awarded the Better Business Bureau Award of Distinction in the Energy Providers category in 2014, 2015, and 2017. A proud partner of the Houston Dynamo, Compare Electricity Plans is committed to giving back to the community by supporting organizations such as Kicks for Kids, Susan G. Komen for the Cure®, and the Sam Houston Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America.
Since the Texas electricity market opened to competition in 2002, many Texas residents have had the opportunity to choose their own electricity provider. Instead of relying on their local utility to provide them with electricity, most Texans can choose from a variety of competitive providers, allowing them to shop around for the perfect electricity plan for their homes and lifestyles.

If you live in the greater Houston area, there are over 60 different energy suppliers competing for your business. Many of these providers have websites that are confusing and difficult to navigate, their rates buried in misleading advertising and dense jargon. Who has the time to sort through and keep track of options across all these different sites?
The increase in retail rates come as companies prepare for surging prices in the wholesale electricity markets where they buy their power. Forecasts of higher than normal temperatures and record power demand are coinciding with the shutdown of at least three coal-fired plants, leading to concerns that temporary shortages on the hottest summer days could send wholesale prices, which typically average less than $50 per megawatt hour, spiking to $3,000 per megawatt hour or higher. (A megawatt hour is 1,000 kilowatt hours.)
Home to the Barbara Bush Library, Gander Mountain and Meyer Park, the city is full of local spots and lets consumers find competitive electric companies in Spring. The city is passionate about preserving its history, dating back to the early 1800s, according to the Old Town Spring site. It even started a nonprofit called the Spring Preservation League Incorporated (SPL) to encourage conservation and promote development in the southeastern Texas city.
Shopping for a plan based on renewable sources is no different than shopping for any other kind of plan — you calculate your costs the same way, look for the same fees, and weigh in customer satisfaction and other perks. The one thing that’s different is also looking at what percentage of your energy comes from renewable content in the EFL. That number can swing from as low as 0 percent all the way up to 100 percent, with the majority of plans that partially offset energy with renewable content hovering around 15 percent.
According to a typical economic theory, prices are optimally determined in a fair and transparent market, and not by a political or academic body. In deregulation of electricity markets, one immediate concern with pricing is that incumbent electricity providers would undercut the prices of new entrants, preventing competition and perpetuating the existing monopoly of providers. Thus, the SB7 bill introduced a phase-in period during which a price floor would be established (for incumbent electricity companies) to prevent this predatory practice, allowing new market entrants to become established. New market entrants could charge a price below the price to beat, but incumbents could not. This period was to last from 2002 to January 1, 2007. As of 2007 Texas investor owned utility affiliates no longer have price to beat tariffs.[6]
Containing some of the most far-reaching landscapes and densely populated cities in the country, Texas is home to a variety of exciting attractions. Along with locations like the Alamo and NASA’s Johnson Space Center, the state also offers natural settings that include the Cascade Caverns and Big Bend National Park. With demand stemming from residents and tourists alike, providing power to the Lone Star State is an important duty to be entrusted only to a dependable electricity resource that can prioritize affordability.
Texas has electricity consumption of $24 billion a year, the highest among the U.S. states. Its annual consumption is comparable to that of Great Britain and Spain, and if the state were an independent nation, its electricity market would be the 11th largest in the world. Texas produces the most wind electricity in the U.S., but also has the highest Carbon Dioxide Emissions of any state.[4] As of 2012, Texas residential electricity rates ranked 31st in the United States and average monthly residential electric bills in Texas were the 5th highest in the nation.[5]
Fixed-rate plans: Fixed-rate plans give customers more stability for their monthly energy bills because the rate a customer signs up with is the rate he or she pays for the length of the plan’s contract. Most fluctuation comes with usage, though transmission and delivery charges and local fees also can change.. Because a fixed-rate plan sometimes spans two-three years, these plans often require a customer credit check and can include early cancellation fees. Fixed-rate plans, because of the continuing market volatility, probably are the best choice for many consumers.
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