Electricity rates in Texas change frequently, and most providers change prices about once a month. On Power To Choose, it’s almost impossible to tell if you’re actually getting the best rates because of the teaser rates and tiered rates. Instead, use a site like Use Your Power To Choose The Best Energy Rates | Electricity Price and you can quickly calculate your actual bill using your kWh usage.

According to a 2014 report[2] by the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power (TCAP), "deregulation cost Texans about $22 billion from 2002 to 2012. And residents in the deregulated market pay prices that are considerably higher than those who live in parts of the state that are still regulated. For example, TCAP found that the average consumer living in one of the areas that opted out of deregulation, such as Austin and San Antonio, paid $288 less in 2012 than consumers in the deregulated areas."


Electricity rates in Texas change frequently, and most providers change prices about once a month. On Power To Choose, it’s almost impossible to tell if you’re actually getting the best rates because of the teaser rates and tiered rates. Instead, use a site like Use Your Power To Choose The Best Energy Rates | Electricity Price and you can quickly calculate your actual bill using your kWh usage.
According to a typical economic theory, prices are optimally determined in a fair and transparent market, and not by a political or academic body. In deregulation of electricity markets, one immediate concern with pricing is that incumbent electricity providers would undercut the prices of new entrants, preventing competition and perpetuating the existing monopoly of providers. Thus, the SB7 bill introduced a phase-in period during which a price floor would be established (for incumbent electricity companies) to prevent this predatory practice, allowing new market entrants to become established. New market entrants could charge a price below the price to beat, but incumbents could not. This period was to last from 2002 to January 1, 2007. As of 2007 Texas investor owned utility affiliates no longer have price to beat tariffs.[6]
Compared to the rest of the nation, data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration which publishes annual state electric prices [8] shows that Texas' electric prices did rise above the national average immediately after deregulation from 2003 to 2009, but, from 2010 to 2015 have moved significantly below the national average price per kWh, with a total cost of $0.0863 per kWh in Texas in 2015 vs. $0.1042 nationally, or 17 percent lower in Texas. Between 2Best Electric the total cost to Texas consumers is estimated to be $24B, an average of $5,100 per household, more than comparable markets under state regulation.[9] [10]
Utility companies are responsible for transmission and delivery of electricity even in energy deregulated parts of Texas and should be contacted in the event of a power outage. Your retail energy supplier may provide you competitive electric rates or exceptional customer service, but they cannot repair power lines or restore your service. In the case of an emergency, contact:
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