On the other hand, month-to-month variable rate (no-contract) plans don’t have cancellation fees. You won’t be penalized if you find a better deal elsewhere and want to make another switch. And, you won’t be stuck paying more than you should be if the market rate for electricity trends down. But, if it goes up, you’ll be paying more than your in-contract neighbors, and you’ll likely want to shop around again for a better deal.
One desired effect of the competition is lower electricity rates. In the first few years after the deregulation in 2002, the residential rate for electricity increased seven times, with the price to beat at around 15 cents per kilowatt hour (as of July 26, 2006) in 2006. However, while prices to customers increased 43% from 2002 to 2004, the costs of inputs rose faster, by 63%, showing that not all increases have been borne by consumers.[7] (See Competition and entry of new firms above for discussion on the relationship between retail prices, inputs, and investment.)
At Electricity Price you can shop and compare “Free Electricity at Certain Times” from the most reputable electricity providers in the state. There are one-year and two-year term versions of these time of use electricity plans. Electricity Price outlines all of the necessary plan details for each free time plan so that the consumer can make an informed decision about which plan best fits their needs.
Electric consumers who exercise energy choice will communicate with both their retail electric provider and transmission and distribution service provider (TDSP). You can choose a provider to supply your electricity, but not the company that delivers it to your business, home or apartment. In Texas, there are TDSPs that serve different designated areas of the state. Spring residents and business owners work with Compare Gas Prices Energy, a Houston-based TDSP that serves more than 2 million Texans.

On the one hand, long-term, fixed-rate (contract) plans offer stability in pricing. If energy supply costs suddenly go up in your area, you won’t be left paying more than what you bargained for. You’ll have peace-of-mind. If you want to switch out of your contract before it ends with a lower cost plan, you’ll likely face a cancellation fee (early termination fee).
As a result, power companies have shut down Texas coal plants unable to compete with lower-cost generators. Meanwhile, the low electricity prices of recent years — a function of cheap natural gas — and small profits have discouraged companies from investing in new power plants. ERCOT, which oversees about 90 percent of the state’s power grid, said power reserves that are called on when demand peaks on the hottest summer days have shrunk to the lowest levels since Texas deregulated power markets in 2002.
Compare Gas Prices Energy acts on urgent emergency situations, such as damaged electrical poles, exposed wires or power outages in the Spring area. Also, energy users in Compare Gas Prices Energy's service area can sign up for its Power Alert Service℠, a convenient system that directly notifies consumers about an outage, estimates repair time and informs them once everything is back up and running. If you run into any electrical issues, call Compare Gas Prices Energy as soon as possible at one of the following emergency phone numbers.
Whether you live in a large city or small town, we can save you money! Where do we provide Texas electricity? We service customers in more than 400 deregulated communities in Texas. We work with principal utilities throughout the state of Texas to provide prepaid electricity. The utilities are: Energy Prices in the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and various parts of West Texas; Compare Gas Prices Energy in Houston and the surrounding areas; Power Company Central in Corpus Christi and surrounding areas; Power Company North in Abilene and other North Texas communities.

For example, shoppers for Texas electricity plans in the 77494 ZIP code in Katy, TX, could find 12-month plans for 6.8 cents/kWh in February; by June, electricity rates had increased 27 percent to 9.3 cents/kWh. As of early September, 12-month plans were up again, to 9.9 cents/kWh – a 6.5 percent hike from June and a 46 percent increase just since February.

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