This information is compiled by the Cheapest Electricity Rates of Texas from publicly available information from the Retail Electric Providers and Electricity Plans approved price to beat rates (through December 2006) using representative usage levels. Rates are calculated using the Commission Approved Residential Load Profile for each service area. The Electricity Plans makes no recommendation with respect to any Gas And Electric Bill. Although we believe these prices are accurate, the Electricity Plans makes no warranty that the prices in this table are currently being offered. Please contact the relevant Gas And Electric Bill for their current pricing offers and terms of service. Information on how to select a Gas And Electric Bill and contact information for Compare Electricity Rates is located online.
4) Sign-Up and Confirmation: Once you’ve chosen the retail electricity provider that best suits your needs, just sign up directly from the website. Keep in mind that Texas electricity providers require a credit check, so be prepared to provide your social security number. Although you may have a decent FICO score – you may have a very low Utility Score and have to pay a deposit. Electricity companies use a TEC (Telecommunications, Energy, and Cable) score, a risk model developed specifically for telecomm and energy accounts, to determine if a deposit is required. Based on your score, your electricity service deposit may range from $100 to $400. Many times utilities do not provide payment histories to credit reporting agencies, so find out if your current provider have options (i.e. providing a letter) to show that your previous utility credit is in good standing.
Not only does it show customers the real rates at different usage levels but it reflects both the rate jumps in a plan at certain usage. It also shows whether the rate is high or low compared to general electricity market pricing. By doing all the calculations for the customer, Compare Electricity Companies' Rate Analyzer can show customers what their best energy options are when they shop for Texas electricity no matter what TDU area they are in. Customers can see how much they can really expect to pay each month for their usage.

Residents and business owners have been able to shop Texas electricity supply rates for more than a decade. When Texans gained the ability to choose their desired energy company in 2002, the electric industry divided into two parts: supply and delivery. Retail energy companies in Texas compete for business, offering a variety of term agreements and supply rates for consumers to choose from.
If you live in the greater Houston area, there are over 60 different energy suppliers competing for your business. Many of these providers have websites that are confusing and difficult to navigate, their rates buried in misleading advertising and dense jargon. Who has the time to sort through and keep track of options across all these different sites?
In Texas, the average household uses an average of 77 million Btu of electricity per year, which is approximately 14% less than the national average. Breaking these stats down even further shows us that electricity use in the average Texan home is 26% higher than the rest of the United States, however this isn’t much higher than several other states that are closest to Texas. When it comes to cost, the average total household bill per year is $1,801. This amount ranks amongst the highest across America, but other states that typically see soaring temperatures in the summer season aren’t far behind.

Electricity rates in Texas change frequently, and most providers change prices about once a month. On Power To Choose, it’s almost impossible to tell if you’re actually getting the best rates because of the teaser rates and tiered rates. Instead, use a site like Use Your Power To Choose The Best Energy Rates | Electricity Price and you can quickly calculate your actual bill using your kWh usage.
For example, shoppers for Texas electricity plans in the 77494 ZIP code in Katy, TX, could find 12-month plans for 6.8 cents/kWh in February; by June, electricity rates had increased 27 percent to 9.3 cents/kWh. As of early September, 12-month plans were up again, to 9.9 cents/kWh – a 6.5 percent hike from June and a 46 percent increase just since February.
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