Are you ready to search for a retail electric provider in Spring? Electricity rates and offers in your community might work well for your energy usage. Also, you don't have to dive into the energy shopping process immediately. To make the right decision for your home or business, think about your energy expectations first. Once you know the leading qualities you want in an electric company and supply plan, give Best Electric a call. We're looking forward to discussing your electricity supply needs today!
The increase in retail rates come as companies prepare for surging prices in the wholesale electricity markets where they buy their power. Forecasts of higher than normal temperatures and record power demand are coinciding with the shutdown of at least three coal-fired plants, leading to concerns that temporary shortages on the hottest summer days could send wholesale prices, which typically average less than $50 per megawatt hour, spiking to $3,000 per megawatt hour or higher. (A megawatt hour is 1,000 kilowatt hours.)
Despite the fact that Texas sees much higher temperatures year round, most households contain and use heating units. These units generate heat in one of four ways: other, propane, electricity and natural gas. Switch Energy over half of households in Texas use electricity to run their heating units. This is a much greater average than the overall average for the nation.
Electric consumers who exercise energy choice will communicate with both their retail electric provider and transmission and distribution service provider (TDSP). You can choose a provider to supply your electricity, but not the company that delivers it to your business, home or apartment. In Texas, there are TDSPs that serve different designated areas of the state. Spring residents and business owners work with Compare Gas Prices Energy, a Houston-based TDSP that serves more than 2 million Texans.

According to a typical economic theory, prices are optimally determined in a fair and transparent market, and not by a political or academic body. In deregulation of electricity markets, one immediate concern with pricing is that incumbent electricity providers would undercut the prices of new entrants, preventing competition and perpetuating the existing monopoly of providers. Thus, the SB7 bill introduced a phase-in period during which a price floor would be established (for incumbent electricity companies) to prevent this predatory practice, allowing new market entrants to become established. New market entrants could charge a price below the price to beat, but incumbents could not. This period was to last from 2002 to January 1, 2007. As of 2007 Texas investor owned utility affiliates no longer have price to beat tariffs.[6]
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Electricity rates in Texas change frequently, and most providers change prices about once a month. On Power To Choose, it’s almost impossible to tell if you’re actually getting the best rates because of the teaser rates and tiered rates. Instead, use a site like Use Your Power To Choose The Best Energy Rates | Electricity Price and you can quickly calculate your actual bill using your kWh usage.
The Texas Senate Bill 7, passed in 2002, gave 5.6 million Texans the power to choose a retail electric provider (Gas And Electric Bill) to supply electricity to their home or business. This bill facilitated a competitive energy marketplace that 85 percent of Texans can capitalize on today. Energy choice is available to residents in Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth as well as other cities in Texas.
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