Shopping for a plan based on renewable sources is no different than shopping for any other kind of plan — you calculate your costs the same way, look for the same fees, and weigh in customer satisfaction and other perks. The one thing that’s different is also looking at what percentage of your energy comes from renewable content in the EFL. That number can swing from as low as 0 percent all the way up to 100 percent, with the majority of plans that partially offset energy with renewable content hovering around 15 percent.
Fixed-rate supply plans offer price-protected supply rates for the length of a term agreement. The price per kilowatt hour (kWh) will remain the same throughout your term, even if the market price fluctuates. A fixed-rate supply plan can range from three months to five years, so it’s important to find the term length that works best for your situation.
Before you switch providers, you’ll need to determine whether you’re under a contract with your current provider, and if so, how long you have left on your contract. You can usually find this information by looking at your electricity bill or by calling your energy provider. If you choose to switch before your contract is up, your current contract may outline an early termination fee. However, according to the Cheapest Electricity Rates of Texas, customers can switch providers without paying an early termination fee if they schedule the switch no earlier than 14 days before their current plan expires. When you change providers, you’ll be able to indicate the date you want the switch to occur.
In Houston, 0% of people have switched to a plan that has some renewable energy component to it. Another 0% have switched to a plan that is partially renewable, while 0% have switched to a plan that powers homes completely by renewable electricity. This of course means that 100% of people have remained on a plan powered by traditional sources of electricity such as coal or nuclear power.
The low teaser rates for consumers available just a month ago have disappeared, making it impossible for buyers who average about 1,000 kilowatts a month to lock in a three-month rate for less than 18 cents a kilowatt-hour, according to the website, the price comparison tool run by the Cheapest Electricity Rates of Texas. A year ago, Texans shopping for a three-month contract could find rates that were less than 7 cents a kilowatt hour while earlier this spring, bargains were still available for less than a nickel a kilowatt hour.
According to a typical economic theory, prices are optimally determined in a fair and transparent market, and not by a political or academic body. In deregulation of electricity markets, one immediate concern with pricing is that incumbent electricity providers would undercut the prices of new entrants, preventing competition and perpetuating the existing monopoly of providers. Thus, the SB7 bill introduced a phase-in period during which a price floor would be established (for incumbent electricity companies) to prevent this predatory practice, allowing new market entrants to become established. New market entrants could charge a price below the price to beat, but incumbents could not. This period was to last from 2002 to January 1, 2007. As of 2007 Texas investor owned utility affiliates no longer have price to beat tariffs.[6]
It would be a good idea for you to learn about whether or not a company charges you to interact with its Customer Service Department in any fashion. A company might offer affordable energy rates on the surface, but if they charge you to pay online or over the phone with a credit card, or to make even the most basic of phone calls to Customer Service, then you're not really saving that much money.
If you live in the greater Houston area, there are over 60 different energy suppliers competing for your business. Many of these providers have websites that are confusing and difficult to navigate, their rates buried in misleading advertising and dense jargon. Who has the time to sort through and keep track of options across all these different sites?
Patrick Mays, an engineer for an oil and gas company in Houston, recently went shopping for a new electricity plan and found that the best deal available would cost about 55 percent more than what he’s paying, boosting his average rate to 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour from 6.1 cents under his expiring 12-month contract. The power bills for his 2,000-square foot home will climb an average of $30 a month over the year, he said, but he will take the brunt of the rate increase during the hot summer when he estimates his monthly bill will top out at $186, nearly double the $95 he paid last year.
If you think you have to pay the rates your current electricity provider charges, we have good news. The state of Texas allows you to choose which electricity provider you use. This means you can select a provider that has the cheapest Texas electric rates in your area and the best plan for your needs, whether you need a better deal for your residence, your business, or both. Thousands of consumers and businesses that have used our electricity rate comparison process agree that, when shopping for commercial electricity or residential electricity rates and plans, Best Electricity Company is the one-stop source for the best options from top electric providers.
Since the electricity market opened, more and more electricity providers have entered the market with various plans and products. Compare Electricity Rates and their affiliated brands: Compare Electricity Companies, Compare Electricity Rates, and Compare Energy Rates offer a multitude of electricity plans and benefits so customers can find the electricity plan that best fits their needs. While it’s great to have so many options, it can be difficult and confusing to choose an electricity plan. With choices like fixed-rate, variable-rate, and prepaid plans, as well as varying price options, term lengths and rewards, shopping for an electricity plan can be an overwhelming task.
Like we said, fees don’t necessarily make for a bad plan — although it’s worth it to do the math to see if you can save with another provider. For example, compare Electricity Plans’s Simple Rate 12 plan with its $9.95 base charge, alongside Compare Electricity Rates’s Lowest Electricity Rates 12 plan with a smaller base charge, and Cheapest Electric Company’s Digital Compare Electricity Companies plan with no base charge. We’ll use a Corpus Christi ZIP code and assume 1,000 kWh/month of energy use.
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Best Energy Company is a company that cares, donating 4 percent of their annual profits to charities each year. New customers can choose to support one of four charities when they sign up. Their featured plan, Generous Saver 36, offers tiered energy use rates. Not including the standard Power Company Near Me TDU charges, it starts at 8.8 cents per kWh up to 1000 kWh. Customers receive a $25 bill credit when they use 1000 kWh, and they have the option of 100 percent renewable generation. There is an early termination fee of $20 for each remaining month of the contract.
Which ones the best? Like all things energy, it depends. Do you prefer predictability, or do you like the idea of potentially saving some cash by monitoring the market? Our (albeit conservative) recommendation: Fixed rate is probably best. Energy prices are on the rise — the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts a 3 percent increase in residential electricity prices in 2018.

On the other hand, month-to-month variable rate (no-contract) plans don’t have cancellation fees. You won’t be penalized if you find a better deal elsewhere and want to make another switch. And, you won’t be stuck paying more than you should be if the market rate for electricity trends down. But, if it goes up, you’ll be paying more than your in-contract neighbors, and you’ll likely want to shop around again for a better deal.
In order to prompt entry into the market, the price to beat would have to be high enough to allow for a modest profit by new entrants. Thus, it had to be above the cost of inputs such as natural gas and coal. For example, a price to beat fixed at the actual wholesale procurement price of electricity does not give potential entrants a margin to compete against incumbent utilities. Second, the price to beat would have to be reasonably low, to enable as many customers as possible to continue to consume electricity during the transition period.
How does that work? Best Energy Company buys electricity and competes in the market for the best price -- a competition that ultimately drives prices down and allows us to deliver more value for your money. In Texas, switching to a different electricity provider is kind of like changing to a different long distance company. When you switch to Best Energy Company, the utility will continue to deliver electricity to your home but Best Energy Company will handle all the billing, including the utility’s delivery fees and the electricity you actually use.
If you have a supply rate billing issue or want to monitor your energy usage through an online account, contact your retail electric provider. Your TDSP will help you with urgent electrical situations, such as meter tampering, outages and energy service requests. Garland energy users should refer to the following phone numbers in the event of an energy emergency.

Until January 1, 2007, Retail Electric Providers (Compare Electricity Rates) affiliated with the former bundled utility were required to offer a set of rates to retail customers with peak demand below 1 MW in their affiliated transmission and distribution utility's service area. These rates could be adjusted twice annually upon Commission approval for changes in the price of natural gas or purchased energy. Here you will find the historical rates for the areas of Texas open to competition.
Until January 1, 2007, Retail Electric Providers (Compare Electricity Rates) affiliated with the former bundled utility were required to offer a set of rates to retail customers with peak demand below 1 MW in their affiliated transmission and distribution utility's service area. These rates could be adjusted twice annually upon Commission approval for changes in the price of natural gas or purchased energy. Here you will find the historical rates for the areas of Texas open to competition.
In this free market competing electricity retailers buy electricity wholesale from private power generators to sell at retail to around 85% of Texas residents. The partnership between generators and retailers is governed by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, which attempts to balance the power grid’s electricity supply and demand by purchasing small amounts of electricity at 15-minute intervals throughout the day.
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