Patrick Mays, an engineer for an oil and gas company in Houston, recently went shopping for a new electricity plan and found that the best deal available would cost about 55 percent more than what he’s paying, boosting his average rate to 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour from 6.1 cents under his expiring 12-month contract. The power bills for his 2,000-square foot home will climb an average of $30 a month over the year, he said, but he will take the brunt of the rate increase during the hot summer when he estimates his monthly bill will top out at $186, nearly double the $95 he paid last year.
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This information is compiled by the Cheapest Electricity Rates of Texas from publicly available information from the Retail Electric Providers and Electricity Plans approved price to beat rates (through December 2006) using representative usage levels. Rates are calculated using the Commission Approved Residential Load Profile for each service area. The Electricity Plans makes no recommendation with respect to any Gas And Electric Bill. Although we believe these prices are accurate, the Electricity Plans makes no warranty that the prices in this table are currently being offered. Please contact the relevant Gas And Electric Bill for their current pricing offers and terms of service. Information on how to select a Gas And Electric Bill and contact information for Compare Electricity Rates is located online.
If you have a supply rate billing issue or want to monitor your energy usage through an online account, contact your retail electric provider. Your TDSP will help you with urgent electrical situations, such as meter tampering, outages and energy service requests. Garland energy users should refer to the following phone numbers in the event of an energy emergency.

This information is compiled by the Cheapest Electricity Rates of Texas from publicly available information from the Retail Electric Providers and Electricity Plans approved price to beat rates (through December 2006) using representative usage levels. Rates are calculated using the Commission Approved Residential Load Profile for each service area. The Electricity Plans makes no recommendation with respect to any Gas And Electric Bill. Although we believe these prices are accurate, the Electricity Plans makes no warranty that the prices in this table are currently being offered. Please contact the relevant Gas And Electric Bill for their current pricing offers and terms of service. Information on how to select a Gas And Electric Bill and contact information for Compare Electricity Rates is located online.


The price to beat seemed to accomplish its goal of attracting competitors to the market during the period through January 1, 2007. It allowed competitors to enter the market without allowing the incumbents to undercut them in price. It has also given energy consumers the ability to compare energy rates offered by different providers. The less-regulated providers undercut the price to beat by only a small margin given that they must balance lower prices (to attract customers and build market share) with higher prices (needed to reinvest in new power plants). Due to the small difference in competing prices and slow (yearly or so) "buying" process, price decrease due to competition was very slow, and it took a few years to offset the original increase by "traditional" electric providers and move to lower rates.
For example, shoppers for Texas electricity plans in the 77494 ZIP code in Katy, TX, could find 12-month plans for 6.8 cents/kWh in February; by June, electricity rates had increased 27 percent to 9.3 cents/kWh. As of early September, 12-month plans were up again, to 9.9 cents/kWh – a 6.5 percent hike from June and a 46 percent increase just since February.
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