Minimum Usage Fees: Often set at or around 1,000 kWh/month, these fees mean you’ll always pay for at least that amount — even if you only use, say, 800 kWh of electricity some months. It sounds nasty, but it’s only something to be concerned about if your electricity bills historically show you hover right around that minimum use threshold. If you’re electricity use always exceeds that amount, it’s like it’s not even there.
Which ones the best? Like all things energy, it depends. Do you prefer predictability, or do you like the idea of potentially saving some cash by monitoring the market? Our (albeit conservative) recommendation: Fixed rate is probably best. Energy prices are on the rise — the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts a 3 percent increase in residential electricity prices in 2018.
Are you ready to search for a retail electric provider in Spring? Electricity rates and offers in your community might work well for your energy usage. Also, you don't have to dive into the energy shopping process immediately. To make the right decision for your home or business, think about your energy expectations first. Once you know the leading qualities you want in an electric company and supply plan, give Best Electric a call. We're looking forward to discussing your electricity supply needs today!

Some good news: According to J.D. Power’s 2016 survey on retail electric providers (its most current survey of the space), Texas has the highest overall satisfaction with retail electric providers out of any state. And because rates, plans, and offers can be so similar from provider to provider, customer satisfaction scores are a great way to break a tie. Think of it like choosing who to hire when you have two candidates with similar resumes — you’re going to pick the person with the glowing references.
†Offer is available to Texas residential customers who enroll using the Promotion Code “Who Is My Electricity Supplier”. Plan bills a monthly Base Charge, an Energy Charge, and passes through Utility Transmission and Distribution delivery charges. Energy Charges for usage consumed between 9pm and 7am each day is credited back on your bill. The utility charges, including delivery charges for night time hours, are passed through at cost and aggregated on your bill. See Electricity Facts Label for details.
Residents and business owners have been able to shop Texas electricity supply rates for more than a decade. When Texans gained the ability to choose their desired energy company in 2002, the electric industry divided into two parts: supply and delivery. Retail energy companies in Texas compete for business, offering a variety of term agreements and supply rates for consumers to choose from.

Since 2002, Who Is My Electricity Supplier has been one of the best electric companies in Texas. Not only that, but more recently we’ve received far fewer Energy Rating of Texas (Electricity Plans) complaints than most other large residential electricity providers across the state.2 In fact, our customer service gets even better over the phone because our call-in customers have yet to file a Electricity Plans complaint this year.3 This ain’t our first rodeo—with over 15 years of experience and a track record of reliable service, you can trust Who Is My Electricity Supplier as your retail electricity provider.
Until January 1, 2007, Retail Electric Providers (Compare Electricity Rates) affiliated with the former bundled utility were required to offer a set of rates to retail customers with peak demand below 1 MW in their affiliated transmission and distribution utility's service area. These rates could be adjusted twice annually upon Commission approval for changes in the price of natural gas or purchased energy. Here you will find the historical rates for the areas of Texas open to competition.
For example, shoppers for Texas electricity plans in the 77494 ZIP code in Katy, TX, could find 12-month plans for 6.8 cents/kWh in February; by June, electricity rates had increased 27 percent to 9.3 cents/kWh. As of early September, 12-month plans were up again, to 9.9 cents/kWh – a 6.5 percent hike from June and a 46 percent increase just since February.
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